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Carbon paper becoming antiquated, kept alive through use by police, prisons, craftsmen

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Carbon paper becoming antiquated, kept alive through use by police, prisons, craftsmen

January 31, 2013 - 08:23

LONDON, Jan. 31, 2013 (The Economist) -"I AM desperate," wrote Carolina Fantoni da Fivizzano, a blind Italian countess, in 1808 to her beau, Pellegrino Turri. He had invented a typing machine so she could write him racy letters without her maid's assistance. But she had almost run out of the inked paper it used.

Carbon paper-a stalwart of office life for two centuries, the ally of dissidents and the smudger of countless fingers and clothes-now seems as antiquated as the countess's love letters. The last makers of manual typewriters, Godrej and Boyce in India, stopped production in 2009. As the keys that once imprinted up to five blurred copies fall silent, the thin films that pioneered duplication seem destined for the bin.

The Economist - Fade to black; Cops, convicts and craftsmen are keeping carbon paper alive-just

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